• Users Online: 55
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 494-498

Does load position on the trunk affect cardiopulmonary responses of the bearer during simulated front and back infant carrying methods?


1 Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu; Physiotherapy Department, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria
3 Department of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
4 Department of Physiotherapy, Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Adaora Justina Okemuo
Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/NJM.NJM_117_20

Rights and Permissions

Background: The position of the infant on the trunk during back and front infant carrying methods (ICMs) may be a potential factor of maternal physiological changes. Related information is necessary for the establishment of guiding principles for infant carrying tasks. Thus, this study was carried out to evaluate cardiopulmonary responses to infant-load positions on the trunk during simulated back and front ICMs. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three nulliparous females completed four trials while walking with a 6 kg simulated infant, being carried in four trunk positions (upper back, lower back, upper front, and lower front). Cardiopulmonary indices (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, and heart rate) and rating of perceived exertion were assessed pre- and post-trials. Results: All the cardiopulmonary indices did not change significantly (P > 0.05) as the infant load moved from upper to lower trunk positions during the back and front ICMs. However, marginal differences were observed. Participants perceived the lower back and upper front ICMs as less exerting than the upper back and lower front ICMs. Conclusions: Infant-load position on the trunk is not an important factor in the cardiopulmonary responses to back and front infant carrying tasks, although the lower back and upper front ICMs were perceived to be more comfortable.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed40    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded7    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal